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3 Publications

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    10/03/12 | Optimization of a GCaMP calcium indicator for neural activity imaging.
    Akerboom J, Chen T, Wardill TJ, Marvin JS, Mutlu S, Carreras Caldero N, Esposti F, Borghuis BG, Sun XR, Gordus A, Orger MB, Portugues R, Engert F, Macklin JJ, Filosa A, Aggarwal A, Kerr R, Takagi R, Kracun S, Shigetomi E, Khakh BS, Baier H, Lagnado L, Wang SS, Bargmann C, Kimmel B, Jayaraman V, Svoboda K, Kim DS, Schreiter ER, Looger LL
    The Journal of Neuroscience. 2012 Oct 3;32:13819-40. doi: 10.1523/​JNEUROSCI.2601-12.2012

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) are powerful tools for systems neuroscience. Recent efforts in protein engineering have significantly increased the performance of GECIs. The state-of-the art single-wavelength GECI, GCaMP3, has been deployed in a number of model organisms and can reliably detect three or more action potentials in short bursts in several systems in vivo . Through protein structure determination, targeted mutagenesis, high-throughput screening, and a battery of in vitro assays, we have increased the dynamic range of GCaMP3 by severalfold, creating a family of “GCaMP5” sensors. We tested GCaMP5s in several systems: cultured neurons and astrocytes, mouse retina, and in vivo in Caenorhabditis chemosensory neurons, Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction and adult antennal lobe, zebrafish retina and tectum, and mouse visual cortex. Signal-to-noise ratio was improved by at least 2- to 3-fold. In the visual cortex, two GCaMP5 variants detected twice as many visual stimulus-responsive cells as GCaMP3. By combining in vivo imaging with electrophysiology we show that GCaMP5 fluorescence provides a more reliable measure of neuronal activity than its predecessor GCaMP3.GCaMP5allows more sensitive detection of neural activity in vivo andmayfind widespread applications for cellular imaging in general.

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    02/22/12 | Excitation spectra and brightness optimization of two-photon excited probes.
    Mütze J, Iyer V, Macklin JJ, Colonell J, Karsh B, Petrá\v sek Ze, Schwille P, Looger LL, Lavis LD, Harris TD
    Biophysical Journal. 2012 Feb 22;102(4):934-44. doi: 10.1016/j.bpj.2011.12.056

    Two-photon probe excitation data are commonly presented as absorption cross section or molecular brightness (the detected fluorescence rate per molecule). We report two-photon molecular brightness spectra for a diverse set of organic and genetically encoded probes with an automated spectroscopic system based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The two-photon action cross section can be extracted from molecular brightness measurements at low excitation intensities, while peak molecular brightness (the maximum molecular brightness with increasing excitation intensity) is measured at higher intensities at which probe photophysical effects become significant. The spectral shape of these two parameters was similar across all dye families tested. Peak molecular brightness spectra, which can be obtained rapidly and with reduced experimental complexity, can thus serve as a first-order approximation to cross-section spectra in determining optimal wavelengths for two-photon excitation, while providing additional information pertaining to probe photostability. The data shown should assist in probe choice and experimental design for multiphoton microscopy studies. Further, we show that, by the addition of a passive pulse splitter, nonlinear bleaching can be reduced-resulting in an enhancement of the fluorescence signal in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy by a factor of two. This increase in fluorescence signal, together with the observed resemblance of action cross section and peak brightness spectra, suggests higher-order photobleaching pathways for two-photon excitation.

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    01/17/12 | Nonlinear structured-illumination microscopy with a photoswitchable protein reveals cellular structures at 50-nm resolution.
    Rego EH, Shao L, Macklin JJ, Winoto L, Johansson GA, Kamps-Hughes N, Davidson MW, Gustafsson MG
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2012 Jan 17;109:E135-43. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1107547108

    Using ultralow light intensities that are well suited for investigating biological samples, we demonstrate whole-cell superresolution imaging by nonlinear structured-illumination microscopy. Structured-illumination microscopy can increase the spatial resolution of a wide-field light microscope by a factor of two, with greater resolution extension possible if the emission rate of the sample responds nonlinearly to the illumination intensity. Saturating the fluorophore excited state is one such nonlinear response, and a realization of this idea, saturated structured-illumination microscopy, has achieved approximately 50-nm resolution on dye-filled polystyrene beads. Unfortunately, because saturation requires extremely high light intensities that are likely to accelerate photobleaching and damage even fixed tissue, this implementation is of limited use for studying biological samples. Here, reversible photoswitching of a fluorescent protein provides the required nonlinearity at light intensities six orders of magnitude lower than those needed for saturation. We experimentally demonstrate approximately 40-nm resolution on purified microtubules labeled with the fluorescent photoswitchable protein Dronpa, and we visualize cellular structures by imaging the mammalian nuclear pore and actin cytoskeleton. As a result, nonlinear structured-illumination microscopy is now a biologically compatible superresolution imaging method.

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