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187 Publications

Showing 31-40 of 187 results
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    11/01/12 | Learning animal social behavior from trajectory features.
    Eyjolfsdottir E, Burgos-Artizzu XP, Branson S, Branson K, Anderson D, Perona P
    Workshop on Visual Observation and Analysis of Animal and Insect Behavior. 2012 Nov:
    11/01/12 | Quantitative semi-automated analysis of morphogenesis with single-cell resolution in complex embryos.
    Giurumescu CA, Kang S, Planchon TA, Betzig E, Bloomekatz J, Yelon D, Cosman P, Chisholm AD
    Development. 2012 Nov;139(22):4271-9. doi: 10.1242/dev.086256

    A quantitative understanding of tissue morphogenesis requires description of the movements of individual cells in space and over time. In transparent embryos, such as C. elegans, fluorescently labeled nuclei can be imaged in three-dimensional time-lapse (4D) movies and automatically tracked through early cleavage divisions up to  350 nuclei. A similar analysis of later stages of C. elegans development has been challenging owing to the increased error rates of automated tracking of large numbers of densely packed nuclei. We present Nucleitracker4D, a freely available software solution for tracking nuclei in complex embryos that integrates automated tracking of nuclei in local searches with manual curation. Using these methods, we have been able to track >99% of all nuclei generated in the C. elegans embryo. Our analysis reveals that ventral enclosure of the epidermis is accompanied by complex coordinated migration of the neuronal substrate. We can efficiently track large numbers of migrating nuclei in 4D movies of zebrafish cardiac morphogenesis, suggesting that this approach is generally useful in situations in which the number, packing or dynamics of nuclei present challenges for automated tracking.

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    10/30/12 | Plasticity of the asialoglycoprotein receptor deciphered by ensemble FRET imaging and single-molecule counting PALM imaging.
    Renz M, Daniels BR, Vámosi G, Arias IM, Lippincott-Schwartz J
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2012 Oct 30;109(44):E2989-97. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1211753109

    The stoichiometry and composition of membrane protein receptors are critical to their function. However, the inability to assess receptor subunit stoichiometry in situ has hampered efforts to relate receptor structures to functional states. Here, we address this problem for the asialoglycoprotein receptor using ensemble FRET imaging, analytical modeling, and single-molecule counting with photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). We show that the two subunits of asialoglycoprotein receptor [rat hepatic lectin 1 (RHL1) and RHL2] can assemble into both homo- and hetero-oligomeric complexes, displaying three forms with distinct ligand specificities that coexist on the plasma membrane: higher-order homo-oligomers of RHL1, higher-order hetero-oligomers of RHL1 and RHL2 with two-to-one stoichiometry, and the homo-dimer RHL2 with little tendency to further homo-oligomerize. Levels of these complexes can be modulated in the plasma membrane by exogenous ligands. Thus, even a simple two-subunit receptor can exhibit remarkable plasticity in structure, and consequently function, underscoring the importance of deciphering oligomerization in single cells at the single-molecule level.

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    10/30/12 | Plasticity of the asialoglycoprotein receptor deciphered by ensemble FRET imaging and single-molecule counting PALM imaging.
    Renz M, Daniels BR, Vámosi G, Arias IM, Lippincott-Schwartz J
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2012 Oct 30;109(44):E2989-97. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1211753109

    The stoichiometry and composition of membrane protein receptors are critical to their function. However, the inability to assess receptor subunit stoichiometry in situ has hampered efforts to relate receptor structures to functional states. Here, we address this problem for the asialoglycoprotein receptor using ensemble FRET imaging, analytical modeling, and single-molecule counting with photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). We show that the two subunits of asialoglycoprotein receptor [rat hepatic lectin 1 (RHL1) and RHL2] can assemble into both homo- and hetero-oligomeric complexes, displaying three forms with distinct ligand specificities that coexist on the plasma membrane: higher-order homo-oligomers of RHL1, higher-order hetero-oligomers of RHL1 and RHL2 with two-to-one stoichiometry, and the homo-dimer RHL2 with little tendency to further homo-oligomerize. Levels of these complexes can be modulated in the plasma membrane by exogenous ligands. Thus, even a simple two-subunit receptor can exhibit remarkable plasticity in structure, and consequently function, underscoring the importance of deciphering oligomerization in single cells at the single-molecule level.

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    10/25/12 | A GAL4-driver line resource for Drosophila neurobiology.
    Jenett A, Rubin GM, Ngo TB, Shepherd D, Murphy C, Dionne H, Pfeiffer BD, Cavallaro A, Hall D, Jeter J, Iyer N, Fetter D, Hausenfluck JH, Peng H, Trautman ET, Svirskas RR, Myers EW, Iwinski ZR, Aso Y, Depasquale GM, Enos A, Hulamm P, Lam SC, Li H, Laverty TR, Long F, Qu L, Murphy SD, Rokicki K, Safford T, Shaw K, Simpson JH, Sowell A, Tae S, Yu Y, Zugates CT
    Cell Reports. 2012 Oct 25;2(4):991-1001. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2012.09.011

    We established a collection of 7,000 transgenic lines of Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of GAL4 in each line is controlled by a different, defined fragment of genomic DNA that serves as a transcriptional enhancer. We used confocal microscopy of dissected nervous systems to determine the expression patterns driven by each fragment in the adult brain and ventral nerve cord. We present image data on 6,650 lines. Using both manual and machine-assisted annotation, we describe the expression patterns in the most useful lines. We illustrate the utility of these data for identifying novel neuronal cell types, revealing brain asymmetry, and describing the nature and extent of neuronal shape stereotypy. The GAL4 lines allow expression of exogenous genes in distinct, small subsets of the adult nervous system. The set of DNA fragments, each driving a documented expression pattern, will facilitate the generation of additional constructs for manipulating neuronal function. synapse was substantially elevated, at the endocytic zone there was no enhanced polymerization activity. We conclude that actin subserves spatially diverse, independently regulated processes throughout spines. Perisynaptic actin forms a uniquely dynamic structure well suited for direct, active regulation of the synapse.

    For the overall strategy and methods used to produce the GAL4 lines:
    Pfeiffer, B.D., Jenett, A., Hammonds, A.S., Ngo, T.T., Misra, S., Murphy, C., Scully, A., Carlson, J.W., Wan, K.H., Laverty, T.R., Mungall, C., Svirskas, R., Kadonaga, J.T., Doe, C.Q., Eisen, M.B., Celniker, S.E., Rubin, G.M. (2008). Tools for neuroanatomy and neurogenetics in Drosophila. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 105, 9715-9720. http://www.pnas.org/content/105/28/9715.full.pdf+html synapse was substantially elevated, at the endocytic zone there was no enhanced polymerization activity. We conclude that actin subserves spatially diverse, independently regulated processes throughout spines. Perisynaptic actin forms a uniquely dynamic structure well suited for direct, active regulation of the synapse.

    For data on expression in the embryo:
    Manning, L., Purice, M.D., Roberts, J., Pollard, J.L., Bennett, A.L., Kroll, J.R., Dyukareva, A.V., Doan, P.N., Lupton, J.R., Strader, M.E., Tanner, S., Bauer, D., Wilbur, A., Tran, K.D., Laverty, T.R., Pearson, J.C., Crews, S.T., Rubin, G.M., and Doe, C.Q. (2012) Annotated embryonic CNS expression patterns of 5000 GMR GAL4 lines: a resource for manipulating gene expression and analyzing cis-regulatory motifs. Cell Reports (2012) Doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2012.09.009 http://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(12)00290-2 synapse was substantially elevated, at the endocytic zone there was no enhanced polymerization activity. We conclude that actin subserves spatially diverse, independently regulated processes throughout spines. Perisynaptic actin forms a uniquely dynamic structure well suited for direct, active regulation of the synapse.

    For data on expression in imaginal discs:
    Jory, A., Estella, C., Giorgianni, M.W., Slattery, M., Laverty, T.R., Rubin, G.M., and Mann, R.S. (2012) A survey of 6300 genomic fragments for cis-regulatory activity in the imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster. Cell Reports (2012) Doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2012.09.010 http://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(12)00291-4 synapse was substantially elevated, at the endocytic zone there was no enhanced polymerization activity. We conclude that actin subserves spatially diverse, independently regulated processes throughout spines. Perisynaptic actin forms a uniquely dynamic structure well suited for direct, active regulation of the synapse.

    For data on expression in the larval nervous system:
    Li, H.-H., Kroll, J.R., Lennox, S., Ogundeyi, O., Jeter, J., Depasquale, G., and Truman, J.W. (2013) A GAL4 driver resource for developmental and behavioral studies on the larval CNS of Drosophila. Cell Reports (submitted).

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    10/25/12 | A resource for manipulating gene expression and analyzing cis-regulatory modules in the Drosophila CNS.
    Manning L, Heckscher ES, Purice MD, Roberts J, Bennett AL, Kroll JR, Pollard JL, Strader ME, Lupton JR, Dyukareva AV, Doan PN, Bauer DM, Wilbur AN, Tanner S, Kelly JJ, Lai S, Tran KD, Kohwi M, Laverty TR, Pearson JC, Crews ST, Rubin GM, Doe CQ
    Cell Reports. 2012 Oct 25;2(4):1002-13. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2012.09.009

    Here, we describe the embryonic central nervous system expression of 5,000 GAL4 lines made using molecularly defined cis-regulatory DNA inserted into a single attP genomic location. We document and annotate the patterns in early embryos when neurogenesis is at its peak, and in older embryos where there is maximal neuronal diversity and the first neural circuits are established. We note expression in other tissues, such as the lateral body wall (muscle, sensory neurons, and trachea) and viscera. Companion papers report on the adult brain and larval imaginal discs, and the integrated data sets are available online (http://www.janelia.org/gal4-gen1). This collection of embryonically expressed GAL4 lines will be valuable for determining neuronal morphology and function. The 1,862 lines expressed in small subsets of neurons (<20/segment) will be especially valuable for characterizing interneuronal diversity and function, because although interneurons comprise the majority of all central nervous system neurons, their gene expression profile and function remain virtually unexplored.

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    10/25/12 | A survey of 6,300 genomic fragments for cis-regulatory activity in the imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster.
    Jory A, Estella C, Giorgianni MW, Slattery M, Laverty TR, Rubin GM, Mann RS
    Cell Reports. 2012 Oct 25;2(4):1014-24. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2012.09.010

    Over 6,000 fragments from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster were analyzed for their ability to drive expression of GAL4 reporter genes in the third-instar larval imaginal discs. About 1,200 reporter genes drove expression in the eye, antenna, leg, wing, haltere, or genital imaginal discs. The patterns ranged from large regions to individual cells. About 75% of the active fragments drove expression in multiple discs; 20% were expressed in ventral, but not dorsal, discs (legs, genital, and antenna), whereas \~{}23% were expressed in dorsal but not ventral discs (wing, haltere, and eye). Several patterns, for example, within the leg chordotonal organ, appeared a surprisingly large number of times. Unbiased searches for DNA sequence motifs suggest candidate transcription factors that may regulate enhancers with shared activities. Together, these expression patterns provide a valuable resource to the community and offer a broad overview of how transcriptional regulatory information is distributed in the Drosophila genome.

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    10/24/12 | Advanced Programming with ImgLib2
    Pietzsch T, Preibisch S, Tomancak P, Saalfeld S
    Proceedings of the ImageJ User and Developer Conference. 2012 Oct 24:
    10/24/12 | ImgLib2—Generic Image Processing in Java
    Saalfeld S, Pietzsch T, Tomancak P, Preibisch S
    ImageJ User and Developer Conference. 2012 Oct 24:
    10/24/12 | Introduction to ImgLib2
    Preibisch S, Pietzsch T, Myers E, Tomancak P, Saalfeld S
    Proceedings of the ImageJ User and Developer Conference. 2012 Oct 24: