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134 Publications

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    Looger Lab
    01/01/09 | Modulating protein interactions by rational and computational design.
    Marvin JS, Looger LL
    Protein Engineering and Design. 2009:343-66
    Looger LabSvoboda Lab
    08/06/08 | Reporting neural activity with genetically encoded calcium indicators.
    Hires SA, Tian L, Looger LL
    Brain Cell Biology. 2008 Aug 6;36(1-4):69-86. doi: 10.1007/s11068-008-9029-4

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), based on recombinant fluorescent proteins, have been engineered to observe calcium transients in living cells and organisms. Through observation of calcium, these indicators also report neural activity. We review progress in GECI construction and application, particularly toward in vivo monitoring of sparse action potentials (APs). We summarize the extrinsic and intrinsic factors that influence GECI performance. A simple model of GECI response to AP firing demonstrates the relative significance of these factors. We recommend a standardized protocol for evaluating GECIs in a physiologically relevant context. A potential method of simultaneous optical control and recording of neuronal circuits is presented.

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    Looger LabSchreiter Lab
    07/01/08 | Crystallization and preliminary x-ray characterization of the genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator protein GCaMP2.
    Rodríguez Guilbe MM, Alfaro Malavé EC, Akerboom J, Marvin JS, Looger LL, Schreiter ER
    Acta Crystallographica. Section F, Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications. 2008 Jul 1;64:629-31. doi: 10.1107/S1744309108016059

    Fluorescent proteins and their engineered variants have played an important role in the study of biology. The genetically encoded calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 comprises a circularly permuted fluorescent protein coupled to the calcium-binding protein calmodulin and a calmodulin target peptide, M13, derived from the intracellular calmodulin target myosin light-chain kinase and has been used to image calcium transients in vivo. To aid rational efforts to engineer improved variants of GCaMP2, this protein was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 A resolution. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.1.

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    Looger Lab
    01/01/08 | Genetically encoded fluorescent sensors for studying healthy and diseased nervous systems.
    Tian L, Looger LL
    Drug Discovery Today. Disease Models. 2008;5(1):27-35. doi: 10.1016/j.ddmod.2008.07.003

    Neurons and glia are functionally organized into circuits and higher-order structures via synaptic connectivity, well-orchestrated molecular signaling, and activity-dependent refinement. Such organization allows the precise information processing required for complex behaviors. Disruption of nervous systems by genetic deficiency or events such as trauma or environmental exposure may produce a diseased state in which certain aspects of inter-neuron signaling are impaired. Optical imaging techniques allow the direct visualization of individual neurons in a circuit environment. Imaging probes specific for given biomolecules may help elucidate their contribution to proper circuit function. Genetically encoded sensors can visualize trafficking of particular molecules in defined neuronal populations, non-invasively in intact brain or reduced preparations. Sensor analysis in healthy and diseased brains may reveal important differences and shed light on the development and progression of nervous system disorders. We review the field of genetically encoded sensors for molecules and cellular events, and their potential applicability to the study of nervous system disease.

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