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3 Publications

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    02/15/22 | Glutamate indicators with improved activation kinetics and localization for imaging synaptic transmission
    Abhi Aggarwal , Rui Liu , Yang Chen , Amelia J Ralowicz , Samuel J Bergerson , Filip Tomaska , Timothy L Hanson , Jeremy P Hasseman , Daniel Reep , Getahun Tsegaye , Pantong Yao , Xiang Ji , Marinus Kloos , Deepika Walpita , Ronak Patel , Paul W Tilberg , Boaz Mohar , GENIE , Loren L Looger , Jonathan S Marvin , Michael B Hoppa , Arthur Konnerth , David Kleinfeld , Eric R Schreiter , Kaspar Podgorski
    bioRxiv PrePrint. 2022 Feb 15:. doi: 10.1101/2022.02.13.480251

    The fluorescent glutamate indicator iGluSnFR enables imaging of neurotransmission with genetic and molecular specificity. However, existing iGluSnFR variants exhibit saturating activation kinetics and are excluded from post-synaptic densities, limiting their ability to distinguish synaptic from extrasynaptic glutamate. Using a multi-assay screen in bacteria, soluble protein, and cultured neurons, we generated novel variants with improved kinetics and signal-to-noise ratios. We also developed surface display constructs that improve iGluSnFR’s nanoscopic localization to post-synapses. The resulting indicator, iGluSnFR3, exhibits rapid non-saturating activation kinetics and reports synaptic glutamate release with improved linearity and increased specificity versus extrasynaptic signals in cultured neurons. In mouse visual cortex, imaging of iGluSnFR3 at individual boutons reported single electrophysiologically-observed action potentials with high specificity versus non-synaptic transients. In vibrissal sensory cortex Layer 4, we used iGluSnFR3 to characterize distinct patterns of touch-evoked feedforward input from thalamocortical boutons and both feedforward and recurrent input onto L4 cortical neuron dendritic spines.

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    05/25/20 | jYCaMP: an optimized calcium indicator for two-photon imaging at fiber laser wavelengths.
    Mohr MA, Bushey D, Aggarwal A, Marvin JS, Kim JJ, Marquez EJ, Liang Y, Patel R, Macklin JJ, Lee C, Tsang A, Tsegaye G, Ahrens AM, Chen JL, Kim DS, Wong AM, Looger LL, Schreiter ER, Podgorski K
    Nature Methods. 2020 May 25;17(1):694-97. doi: 10.1038/s41592-020-0835-7

    Femtosecond lasers at fixed wavelengths above 1,000 nm are powerful, stable and inexpensive, making them promising sources for two-photon microscopy. Biosensors optimized for these wavelengths are needed for both next-generation microscopes and affordable turn-key systems. Here we report jYCaMP1, a yellow variant of the calcium indicator jGCaMP7 that outperforms its parent in mice and flies at excitation wavelengths above 1,000 nm and enables improved two-color calcium imaging with red fluorescent protein-based indicators.

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    07/29/19 | Kilohertz frame-rate two-photon tomography.
    Kazemipour A, Novak O, Flickinger D, Marvin JS, Abdelfattah AS, King J, Borden P, Kim J, Al-Abdullatif S, Deal P, Miller E, Schreiter E, Druckmann S, Svoboda K, Looger L, Podgorski K
    Nature Methods. 2019 Jul 29;16(8):778-86. doi: 10.1101/357269

    Point-scanning two-photon microscopy enables high-resolution imaging within scattering specimens such as the mammalian brain, but sequential acquisition of voxels fundamentally limits imaging speed. We developed a two-photon imaging technique that scans lines of excitation across a focal plane at multiple angles and uses prior information to recover high-resolution images at over 1.4 billion voxels per second. Using a structural image as a prior for recording neural activity, we imaged visually-evoked and spontaneous glutamate release across hundreds of dendritic spines in mice at depths over 250 microns and frame-rates over 1 kHz. Dendritic glutamate transients in anaesthetized mice are synchronized within spatially-contiguous domains spanning tens of microns at frequencies ranging from 1-100 Hz. We demonstrate high-speed recording of acetylcholine and calcium sensors, 3D single-particle tracking, and imaging in densely-labeled cortex. Our method surpasses limits on the speed of raster-scanned imaging imposed by fluorescence lifetime.

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