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30 Janelia Publications

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    09/08/17 | Behavioral time scale synaptic plasticity underlies CA1 place fields.
    Bittner KC, Milstein AD, Grienberger C, Romani S, Magee JC
    Science (New York, N.Y.). 2017 Sep 08;357(6355):1033-1036. doi: 10.1126/science.aan3846

    Learning is primarily mediated by activity-dependent modifications of synaptic strength within neuronal circuits. We discovered that place fields in hippocampal area CA1 are produced by a synaptic potentiation notably different from Hebbian plasticity. Place fields could be produced in vivo in a single trial by potentiation of input that arrived seconds before and after complex spiking. The potentiated synaptic input was not initially coincident with action potentials or depolarization. This rule, named behavioral time scale synaptic plasticity, abruptly modifies inputs that were neither causal nor close in time to postsynaptic activation. In slices, five pairings of subthreshold presynaptic activity and calcium (Ca(2+)) plateau potentials produced a large potentiation with an asymmetric seconds-long time course. This plasticity efficiently stores entire behavioral sequences within synaptic weights to produce predictive place cell activity.

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    01/23/17 | Inhibitory suppression of heterogeneously tuned excitation enhances spatial coding in CA1 place cells.
    Grienberger C, Milstein AD, Bittner KC, Romani S, Magee JC
    Nature Neuroscience. 2017 Jan 23;20(3):417-26. doi: 10.1038/nn.4486

    Place cells in the CA1 region of the hippocampus express location-specific firing despite receiving a steady barrage of heterogeneously tuned excitatory inputs that should compromise output dynamic range and timing. We examined the role of synaptic inhibition in countering the deleterious effects of off-target excitation. Intracellular recordings in behaving mice demonstrate that bimodal excitation drives place cells, while unimodal excitation drives weaker or no spatial tuning in interneurons. Optogenetic hyperpolarization of interneurons had spatially uniform effects on place cell membrane potential dynamics, substantially reducing spatial selectivity. These data and a computational model suggest that spatially uniform inhibitory conductance enhances rate coding in place cells by suppressing out-of-field excitation and by limiting dendritic amplification. Similarly, we observed that inhibitory suppression of phasic noise generated by out-of-field excitation enhances temporal coding by expanding the range of theta phase precession. Thus, spatially uniform inhibition allows proficient and flexible coding in hippocampal CA1 by suppressing heterogeneously tuned excitation.

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    06/08/16 | Brain heating induced by near infrared lasers during multi-photon microscopy.
    Podgorski K, Ranganathan GN
    Journal of Neurophysiology. 2016 Jun 8;116(3):1012-23. doi: 10.1152/jn.00275.2016

    Two-photon imaging and optogenetic stimulation rely on high illumination powers, particularly for state-of-the-art applications that target deeper structures, achieve faster measurements, or probe larger brain areas. However, little information is available on heating and resulting damage induced by high-power illumination in the brain. Here we used thermocouple probes and quantum dot nanothermometers to measure temperature changes induced by two-photon microscopy in the neocortex of awake and anaesthetized mice. We characterized heating as a function of wavelength, exposure time, and distance from the center of illumination. Although total power is highest near the surface of the brain, heating was most severe hundreds of microns below the focal plane, due to heat dissipation through the cranial window. Continuous illumination of a 1mm2 area produced a peak temperature increase of approximately 1.8°C/100mW. Continuous illumination with powers above 250 mW induced lasting damage, detected with immunohistochemistry against Iba1, GFAP, heat shock proteins, and activated Caspase-3. Higher powers were usable in experiments with limited duty ratios, suggesting an approach to mitigate damage in high-power microscopy experiments.

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    02/17/16 | Axonal Filtering Allows Reliable Output during Dendritic Plateau-Driven Complex Spiking in CA1 Neurons.
    Apostolides PF, Milstein AD, Grienberger C, Bittner KC, Magee JC
    Neuron. 2016 Feb 17;89(4):770-783. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.12.040

    In CA1 pyramidal neurons, correlated inputs trigger dendritic plateau potentials that drive neuronal plasticity and firing rate modulation. Given the strong electrotonic coupling between soma and axon, the >25 mV depolarization associated with the plateau could propagate through the axon to influence action potential initiation, propagation, and neurotransmitter release. We examined this issue in brain slices, awake mice, and a computational model. Despite profoundly inactivating somatic and proximal axon Na(+) channels, plateaus evoked action potentials that recovered to full amplitude in the distal axon (>150 μm) and triggered neurotransmitter release similar to regular spiking. This effect was due to strong attenuation of plateau depolarizations by axonal K(+) channels, allowing full axon repolarization and Na(+) channel deinactivation. High-pass filtering of dendritic plateaus by axonal K(+) channels should thus enable accurate transmission of gain-modulated firing rates, allowing neuronal firing to be efficiently read out by downstream regions as a simple rate code.

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    09/23/15 | Inhibitory Gating of Input Comparison in the CA1 Microcircuit.
    Milstein AD, Bloss EB, Apostolides PF, Vaidya SP, Dilly GA, Zemelman BV, Magee JC
    Neuron. 2015 Sep 23;87(6):1274-89. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.08.025

    Spatial and temporal features of synaptic inputs engage integration mechanisms on multiple scales, including presynaptic release sites, postsynaptic dendrites, and networks of inhibitory interneurons. Here we investigate how these mechanisms cooperate to filter synaptic input in hippocampal area CA1. Dendritic recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons reveal that proximal inputs from CA3 as well as distal inputs from entorhinal cortex layer III (ECIII) sum sublinearly or linearly at low firing rates due to feedforward inhibition, but sum supralinearly at high firing rates due to synaptic facilitation, producing a high-pass filter. However, during ECIII and CA3 input comparison, supralinear dendritic integration is dynamically balanced by feedforward and feedback inhibition, resulting in suppression of dendritic complex spiking. We find that a particular subpopulation of CA1 interneurons expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) contributes prominently to this dynamic filter by integrating both ECIII and CA3 input pathways and potently inhibiting CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrites.

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    07/13/15 | Conjunctive input processing drives feature selectivity in hippocampal CA1 neurons.
    Bittner KC, Grienberger C, Vaidya SP, Milstein AD, Macklin JJ, Suh J, Tonegawa S, Magee JC
    Nature Neuroscience. 2015 Jul 13:. doi: 10.1038/nn.4062

    Feature-selective firing allows networks to produce representations of the external and internal environments. Despite its importance, the mechanisms generating neuronal feature selectivity are incompletely understood. In many cortical microcircuits the integration of two functionally distinct inputs occurs nonlinearly through generation of active dendritic signals that drive burst firing and robust plasticity. To examine the role of this processing in feature selectivity, we recorded CA1 pyramidal neuron membrane potential and local field potential in mice running on a linear treadmill. We found that dendritic plateau potentials were produced by an interaction between properly timed input from entorhinal cortex and hippocampal CA3. These conjunctive signals positively modulated the firing of previously established place fields and rapidly induced new place field formation to produce feature selectivity in CA1 that is a function of both entorhinal cortex and CA3 input. Such selectivity could allow mixed network level representations that support context-dependent spatial maps.

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    Cui LabMagee Lab
    07/13/15 | Continuous volumetric imaging via an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens.
    Kong L, Tang J, Little JP, Yu Y, Lämmermann T, Lin CP, Germain RN, Cui M
    Nature Methods. 2015-Jul 13;12(8):759-62. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.3476

    In vivo imaging at high spatiotemporal resolution is key to the understanding of complex biological systems. We integrated an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens into a two-photon fluorescence microscope and achieved microsecond-scale axial scanning, thus enabling volumetric imaging at tens of hertz. We applied this system to multicolor volumetric imaging of processes sensitive to motion artifacts, including calcium dynamics in behaving mouse brain and transient morphology changes and trafficking of immune cells.

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    02/06/15 | Dendritic function in vivo.
    Grienberger C, Chen X, Konnerth A
    Trends in Neuroscience. 2015 Jan;38(1):45-54. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2014.11.002

    Dendrites are the predominant entry site for excitatory synaptic potentials in most types of central neurons. There is increasing evidence that dendrites are not just passive transmitting devices but play active roles in synaptic integration through linear and non-linear mechanisms. Frequently, excitatory synapses are formed on dendritic spines. In addition to relaying incoming electrical signals, spines can play important roles in modifying these signals through complex biochemical processes and, thereby, determine learning and memory formation. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the function of spines and dendrites in central mammalian neurons in vivo by focusing particularly on insights obtained from Ca(2+) imaging studies.

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    01/21/15 | Distribution and Function of HCN Channels in the Apical Dendritic Tuft of Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons.
    Harnett MT, Magee JC, Williams SR
    Journal of Neuroscience. 2015 Jan 21;35(3):1024-37. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2813-14.2015

    The apical tuft is the most remote area of the dendritic tree of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Despite its distal location, the apical dendritic tuft of layer 5 pyramidal neurons receives substantial excitatory synaptic drive and actively processes corticocortical input during behavior. The properties of the voltage-activated ion channels that regulate synaptic integration in tuft dendrites have, however, not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we use electrophysiological and optical approaches to examine the subcellular distribution and function of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated nonselective cation (HCN) channels in rat layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Outside-out patch recordings demonstrated that the amplitude and properties of ensemble HCN channel activity were uniform in patches excised from distal apical dendritic trunk and tuft sites. Simultaneous apical dendritic tuft and trunk whole-cell current-clamp recordings revealed that the pharmacological blockade of HCN channels decreased voltage compartmentalization and enhanced the generation and spread of apical dendritic tuft and trunk regenerative activity. Furthermore, multisite two-photon glutamate uncaging demonstrated that HCN channels control the amplitude and duration of synaptically evoked regenerative activity in the distal apical dendritic tuft. In contrast, at proximal apical dendritic trunk and somatic recording sites, the blockade of HCN channels decreased excitability. Dynamic-clamp experiments revealed that these compartment-specific actions of HCN channels were heavily influenced by the local and distributed impact of the high density of HCN channels in the distal apical dendritic arbor. The properties and subcellular distribution pattern of HCN channels are therefore tuned to regulate the interaction between integration compartments in layer 5B pyramidal neurons.

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    Druckmann LabMagee Lab
    02/05/14 | Structured synaptic connectivity between hippocampal regions.
    Shaul Druckmann , Feng L, Lee B, Yook C, Zhao T, Magee JC, Kim J
    Neuron. 2014 Feb 5;81:629-40. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2013.11.026

    The organization of synaptic connectivity within a neuronal circuit is a prime determinant of circuit function. We performed a comprehensive fine-scale circuit mapping of hippocampal regions (CA3-CA1) using the newly developed synapse labeling method, mGRASP. This mapping revealed spatially nonuniform and clustered synaptic connectivity patterns. Furthermore, synaptic clustering was enhanced between groups of neurons that shared a similar developmental/migration time window, suggesting a mechanism for establishing the spatial structure of synaptic connectivity. Such connectivity patterns are thought to effectively engage active dendritic processing and storage mechanisms, thereby potentially enhancing neuronal feature selectivity.

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