Main Menu (Mobile)- Block

Main Menu - Block

custom | custom

Search Results

filters_region_cap | custom

Filter

facetapi-Q2b17qCsTdECvJIqZJgYMaGsr8vANl1n | block

Associated Lab

facetapi-W9JlIB1X0bjs93n1Alu3wHJQTTgDCBGe | block
facetapi-61yz1V0li8B1bixrCWxdAe2aYiEXdhd0 | block
facetapi-PV5lg7xuz68EAY8eakJzrcmwtdGEnxR0 | block
general_search_page-panel_pane_1 | views_panes

2127 Janelia Publications

Showing 71-80 of 2127 results
02/22/22 | Neural Algorithms and Circuits for Motor Planning.
Inagaki HK, Chen S, Daie K, Finklestein A, Fontolan L, Romani S, Svoboda K
Annual Reviews Neuroscience. 2022 Feb 22:. doi: 10.1146/annurev-neuro-092021-121730

The brain plans and executes volitional movements. The underlying patterns of neural population activity have been explored in the context of movements of the eyes, limbs, tongue, and head in nonhuman primates and rodents. How do networks of neurons produce the slow neural dynamics that prepare specific movements and the fast dynamics that ultimately initiate these movements? Recent work exploits rapid and calibrated perturbations of neural activity to test specific dynamical systems models that are capable of producing the observed neural activity. These joint experimental and computational studies show that cortical dynamics during motor planning reflect fixed points of neural activity (attractors). Subcortical control signals reshape and move attractors over multiple timescales, causing commitment to specific actions and rapid transitions to movement execution. Experiments in rodents are beginning to reveal how these algorithms are implemented at the level of brain-wide neural circuits. Expected final online publication date for the , Volume 45 is July 2022. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

View Publication Page
02/19/22 | Volume-transmitted GABA waves drive epileptiform rhythms in the hippocampal network.
Vincent Magloire , Leonid P. Savtchenko , Sergyi Sylantyev , Thomas P. Jensen , Nicholas Cole , Jonathan S. Marvin , Loren L. Looger , Dimitri M. Kullmann , Matthew C. Walker , Ivan Pavlov , Dmitri A. Rusakov
bioRxiv. 2022 Feb 19:. doi: 10.1101/2021.03.25.437016

Synchronised rhythmic activity of the brain is thought to arise from neuronal network behaviours that rely on synaptic signalling between individual cells. This notion has been a basis to explain periodic epileptiform discharges that are driven by interneuronal networks. However, interneuronal discharges not only engage cell-cell GABAergic transmission but also control the extracellular GABA concentration ([GABA]e) and thus tonic GABAA receptor conductance (Gtonic) across the cell population. At the same time, the firing activity of interneurons shows a bell-shaped dependence on Gtonic, suggesting an innate susceptibility to self-sustained oscillations. Here, we employ patch-clamp GABA ‘sniffer’ and fast two-photon excitation imaging of GABA sensor to show that periodic epileptiform discharges are preceded by a region-wide, rising wave of extracellular GABA. Neural network simulations based on such observations reveal that it is the volume-transmitted, extrasynaptic actions of GABA targeting multiple off-target cells that drives synchronised interneuronal spiking prompting periodic epileptiform bursts. We validate this hypothesis using simultaneous patch-clamp recordings from multiple nerve cells, selective optogenetic stimulation of fast-spiking interneurons, and by revealing the role of GABA uptake. Our findings thus unveil a key role of extrasynaptic, volume-transmitted GABA actions in enabling and pacing regenerative rhythmic activity in brain networks.

View Publication Page
02/18/22 | Visualizing cellular and tissue ultrastructure using Ten-fold Robust Expansion Microscopy (TREx)
Hugo G.J. Damstra , Boaz Mohar , Mark Eddison , Anna Akhmanova , Lukas C. Kapitein , Paul W. Tillberg
eLife. 2022 Feb 18:. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.02.03.428837

Expansion microscopy (ExM) is a powerful technique to overcome the diffraction limit of light microscopy that can be applied in both tissues and cells. In ExM, samples are embedded in a swellable polymer gel to physically expand the sample and isotropically increase resolution in x, y and z. The maximum resolution increase is limited by the expansion factor of the polymer gel, which is four-fold for the original ExM protocol. Variations on the original ExM method have been reported that allow for greater expansion factors, for example using iterative expansion, but at the cost of ease of adoption or versatility. Here, we systematically explore the ExM recipe space and present a novel method termed Ten-fold Robust Expansion Microscopy (TREx) that, like the original ExM method, requires no specialized equipment or procedures to carry out. We demonstrate that TREx gels expand ten-fold, can be handled easily, and can be applied to both thick tissue sections and cells enabling high-resolution subcellular imaging in a single expansion step. We show that applying TREx on antibody-stained samples can be combined with off-the-shelf small molecule stains for both total protein and membranes to provide ultrastructural context to subcellular protein localization.

View Publication Page
02/15/22 | Glutamate indicators with improved activation kinetics and localization for imaging synaptic transmission
Abhi Aggarwal , Rui Liu , Yang Chen , Amelia J Ralowicz , Samuel J Bergerson , Filip Tomaska , Timothy L Hanson , Jeremy P Hasseman , Daniel Reep , Getahun Tsegaye , Pantong Yao , Xiang Ji , Marinus Kloos , Deepika Walpita , Ronak Patel , Paul W Tilberg , Boaz Mohar , GENIE , Loren L Looger , Jonathan S Marvin , Michael B Hoppa , Arthur Konnerth , David Kleinfeld , Eric R Schreiter , Kaspar Podgorski
bioRxiv PrePrint. 2022 Feb 15:. doi: 10.1101/2022.02.13.480251

The fluorescent glutamate indicator iGluSnFR enables imaging of neurotransmission with genetic and molecular specificity. However, existing iGluSnFR variants exhibit saturating activation kinetics and are excluded from post-synaptic densities, limiting their ability to distinguish synaptic from extrasynaptic glutamate. Using a multi-assay screen in bacteria, soluble protein, and cultured neurons, we generated novel variants with improved kinetics and signal-to-noise ratios. We also developed surface display constructs that improve iGluSnFR’s nanoscopic localization to post-synapses. The resulting indicator, iGluSnFR3, exhibits rapid non-saturating activation kinetics and reports synaptic glutamate release with improved linearity and increased specificity versus extrasynaptic signals in cultured neurons. In mouse visual cortex, imaging of iGluSnFR3 at individual boutons reported single electrophysiologically-observed action potentials with high specificity versus non-synaptic transients. In vibrissal sensory cortex Layer 4, we used iGluSnFR3 to characterize distinct patterns of touch-evoked feedforward input from thalamocortical boutons and both feedforward and recurrent input onto L4 cortical neuron dendritic spines.

View Publication Page
02/13/22 | Structured random receptive fields enable informative sensory encodings
Biraj Pandey , Marius Pachitariu , Bingni W. Brunton , Kameron Decker Harris
bioRxiv. 2022 Feb 13:. doi: 10.1101/2021.09.09.459651

Brains must represent the outside world so that animals survive and thrive. In early sensory systems, neural populations have diverse receptive fields structured to detect important features in inputs, yet significant variability has been ignored in classical models of sensory neurons. We model neuronal receptive fields as random, variable samples from parametrized distributions in two sensory modalities, using data from insect mechanosensors and neurons of mammalian primary visual cortex. We show that these random feature neurons perform a randomized wavelet transform on inputs which removes high frequency noise and boosts the signal. Our result makes a significant theoretical connection between the foundational concepts of receptive fields in neuroscience and random features in artificial neural networks. Further, these random feature neurons enable learning from fewer training samples and with smaller networks in artificial tasks. This structured random model of receptive fields provides a unifying, mathematically tractable framework to understand sensory encodings across both spatial and temporal domains.

View Publication Page

Perhaps the most valuable single set of resources for genetic studies of Drosophila melanogaster is the collection of multiply-inverted chromosomes commonly known as balancer chromosomes. Balancers prevent the recovery of recombination exchange products within genomic regions included in inversions and allow perpetual maintenance of deleterious alleles in living stocks and the execution of complex genetic crosses. Balancer chromosomes have been generated traditionally by exposing animals to ionizing radiation and screening for altered chromosome structure or for unusual marker segregation patterns. These approaches are tedious and unpredictable, and have failed to produce the desired products in some species. Here I describe transgenic tools that allow targeted chromosome rearrangements in Drosophila species. The key new resources are engineered reporter genes containing introns with yeast recombination sites and enhancers that drive fluorescent reporter genes in multiple body regions. These tools were used to generate a doubly-inverted chromosome 3R in D. simulans that serves as an effective balancer chromosome.

View Publication Page
02/09/22 | Ascending neurons convey behavioral state to integrative sensory and action selection centers in the brain
Chin-Lin Chen , Florian Aymanns , Ryo Minegishi , Victor D. V. Matsuda , Nicolas Talabot , Semih Günel , Barry J. Dickson , Pavan Ramdya
bioRxiv. 2022 Feb 09:. doi: 10.1101/2022.02.09.479566

Knowledge of one’s own behavioral state—whether one is walking, grooming, or resting—is critical for contextualizing sensory cues including interpreting visual motion and tracking odor sources. Additionally, awareness of one’s own posture is important to avoid initiating destabilizing or physically impossible actions. Ascending neurons (ANs), interneurons in the vertebrate spinal cord or insect ventral nerve cord (VNC) that project to the brain, may provide such high-fidelity behavioral state signals. However, little is known about what ANs encode and where they convey signals in any brain. To address this gap, we performed a large-scale functional screen of AN movement encoding, brain targeting, and motor system patterning in the adult fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Using a new library of AN sparse driver lines, we measured the functional properties of 247 genetically-identifiable ANs by performing two-photon microscopy recordings of neural activity in tethered, behaving flies. Quantitative, deep network-based neural and behavioral analyses revealed that ANs nearly exclusively encode high-level behaviors—primarily walking as well as resting and grooming—rather than low-level joint or limb movements. ANs that convey self-motion—resting, walking, and responses to gust-like puff stimuli—project to the brain’s anterior ventrolateral protocerebrum (AVLP), a multimodal, integrative sensory hub, while those that encode discrete actions—eye grooming, turning, and proboscis extension—project to the brain’s gnathal ganglion (GNG), a locus for action selection. The structure and polarity of AN projections within the VNC are predictive of their functional encoding and imply that ANs participate in motor computations while also relaying state signals to the brain. Illustrative of this are ANs that temporally integrate proboscis extensions over tens-of-seconds, likely through recurrent interconnectivity. Thus, in line with long-held theoretical predictions, ascending populations convey high-level behavioral state signals almost exclusively to brain regions implicated in sensory feature contextualization and action selection.

View Publication Page
02/07/22 | The complexin C-terminal amphipathic helix stabilizes the fusion pore open state by sculpting membranes.
Courtney KC, Wu L, Mandal T, Swift M, Zhang Z, Alaghemandi M, Wu Z, Bradberry MM, Deo C, Lavis LD, Volkmann N, Hanein D, Cui Q, Bao H, Chapman ER
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology. 2022 Feb 07;29(2):97-107. doi: 10.1038/s41594-021-00716-0

Neurotransmitter release is mediated by proteins that drive synaptic vesicle fusion with the presynaptic plasma membrane. While soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) form the core of the fusion apparatus, additional proteins play key roles in the fusion pathway. Here, we report that the C-terminal amphipathic helix of the mammalian accessory protein, complexin (Cpx), exerts profound effects on membranes, including the formation of pores and the efficient budding and fission of vesicles. Using nanodisc-black lipid membrane electrophysiology, we demonstrate that the membrane remodeling activity of Cpx modulates the structure and stability of recombinant exocytic fusion pores. Cpx had particularly strong effects on pores formed by small numbers of SNAREs. Under these conditions, Cpx increased the current through individual pores 3.5-fold, and increased the open time fraction from roughly 0.1 to 1.0. We propose that the membrane sculpting activity of Cpx contributes to the phospholipid rearrangements that underlie fusion by stabilizing highly curved membrane fusion intermediates.

View Publication Page
02/01/22 | A neural circuit linking learning and sleep in Drosophila long-term memory.
Lei Z, Henderson K, Keleman K
Nature Communications. 2022 Feb 01;13(1):609. doi: 10.1038/s41467-022-28256-1

Animals retain some but not all experiences in long-term memory (LTM). Sleep supports LTM retention across animal species. It is well established that learning experiences enhance post-learning sleep. However, the underlying mechanisms of how learning mediates sleep for memory retention are not clear. Drosophila males display increased amounts of sleep after courtship learning. Courtship learning depends on Mushroom Body (MB) neurons, and post-learning sleep is mediated by the sleep-promoting ventral Fan-Shaped Body neurons (vFBs). We show that post-learning sleep is regulated by two opposing output neurons (MBONs) from the MB, which encode a measure of learning. Excitatory MBONs-γ2α'1 becomes increasingly active upon increasing time of learning, whereas inhibitory MBONs-β'2mp is activated only by a short learning experience. These MB outputs are integrated by SFS neurons, which excite vFBs to promote sleep after prolonged but not short training. This circuit may ensure that only longer or more intense learning experiences induce sleep and are thereby consolidated into LTM.

View Publication Page
02/01/22 | Caveat fluorophore: an insiders' guide to small-molecule fluorescent labels.
Grimm JB, Lavis LD
Nature Methods. 2022 Feb 01;19(2):149-58. doi: 10.1038/s41592-021-01338-6

The last three decades have brought a revolution in fluorescence microscopy. The development of new microscopes, fluorescent labels and analysis techniques has pushed the frontiers of biological imaging forward, moving from fixed to live cells, from diffraction-limited to super-resolution imaging and from simple cell culture systems to experiments in vivo. The large and ever-evolving collection of tools can be daunting for biologists, who must invest substantial time and effort in adopting new technologies to answer their specific questions. This is particularly relevant when working with small-molecule fluorescent labels, where users must navigate the jargon, idiosyncrasies and caveats of chemistry. Here, we present an overview of chemical dyes used in biology and provide frank advice from a chemist's perspective.

View Publication Page