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1765 Janelia Publications

Showing 71-80 of 1765 results
01/22/20 | Accurate measurement of fast endocytic recycling kinetics in real time.
Jonker CT, Deo C, Zager PJ, Tkachuk AN, Weinstein AM, Rodriguez-Boulan E, Lavis LD, Schreiner R
Journal of Cell Science. 2020 Jan 22;133(2):. doi: 10.1242/jcs.231225

The fast turnover of membrane components through endocytosis and recycling allows precise control of the composition of the plasma membrane. Endocytic recycling can be rapid with some molecules returning to the plasma membrane with a <5 minutes. Existing methods to study these trafficking pathways utilize chemical, radioactive, or fluorescent labeling of cell surface receptors in pulse-chase experiments, which require tedious washing steps and manual collection of samples. Here, we introduce a live-cell endocytic recycling assay, based on a newly designed cell-impermeable, fluorogenic ligand for HaloTag: 'Janelia Fluor 635i' (JFi; i=impermeant) which allows real-time detection of membrane receptor recycling at steady state. We used this method to study the effect of iron depletion on transferrin receptor (TfR) recycling using the chelator desferrioxamine. We found this perturbation significantly increases the TfR recycling rate. The high temporal resolution and simplicity of this assay provides a clear advantage over extant methods and makes it ideal for large scale cellular imaging studies. This assay can be adapted to examine other cellular kinetic parameters such as protein turnover and biosynthetic trafficking.

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01/21/20 | A connectome of the adult drosophila central brain.
Xu CS, Januszewski M, Lu Z, Takemura S, Hayworth KJ, Huang G, Shinomiya K, Maitin-Shepard J, Ackerman D, Berg S, Blakely T, Bogovic J, Clements J, Dolafi T, Hubbard P, Kainmueller D, Katz W, Kawase T, Khairy KA, Leavitt L, Li PH, Lindsey L, Neubarth N, Olbris DJ, Otsuna H, Troutman ET, Umayam L, Zhao T, Ito M, Goldammer J, Wolff T, Svirskas R, Schlegel P, Neace ER, Knecht CJ, Alvarado CX, Bailey DA, Ballinger S, Borycz JA, Canino BS
bioRxiv. 2020 Jan 21:. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.01.21.911859

The neural circuits responsible for behavior remain largely unknown. Previous efforts have reconstructed the complete circuits of small animals, with hundreds of neurons, and selected circuits for larger animals. Here we (the FlyEM project at Janelia and collaborators at Google) summarize new methods and present the complete circuitry of a large fraction of the brain of a much more complex animal, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Improved methods include new procedures to prepare, image, align, segment, find synapses, and proofread such large data sets; new methods that define cell types based on connectivity in addition to morphology; and new methods to simplify access to a large and evolving data set. From the resulting data we derive a better definition of computational compartments and their connections; an exhaustive atlas of cell examples and types, many of them novel; detailed circuits for most of the central brain; and exploration of the statistics and structure of different brain compartments, and the brain as a whole. We make the data public, with a web site and resources specifically designed to make it easy to explore, for all levels of expertise from the expert to the merely curious. The public availability of these data, and the simplified means to access it, dramatically reduces the effort needed to answer typical circuit questions, such as the identity of upstream and downstream neural partners, the circuitry of brain regions, and to link the neurons defined by our analysis with genetic reagents that can be used to study their functions.

Note: In the next few weeks, we will release a series of papers with more involved discussions. One paper will detail the hemibrain reconstruction with more extensive analysis and interpretation made possible by this dense connectome. Another paper will explore the central complex, a brain region involved in navigation, motor control, and sleep. A final paper will present insights from the mushroom body, a center of multimodal associative learning in the fly brain.

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01/17/20 | Correlative three-dimensional super-resolution and block-face electron microscopy of whole vitreously frozen cells.
Hoffman DP, Shtengel G, Xu CS, Campbell KR, Freeman M, Wang L, Milkie DE, Pasolli HA, Iyer N, Bogovic JA, Stabley DR, Shirinifard A, Pang S, Peale D, Schaefer K, Pomp W, Chang C, Lippincott-Schwartz J, Kirchhausen T, Solecki DJ, Betzig E, Hess HF
Science. 2020 Jan 17;367(6475):. doi: 10.1126/science.aaz5357

Within cells, the spatial compartmentalization of thousands of distinct proteins serves a multitude of diverse biochemical needs. Correlative super-resolution (SR) fluorescence and electron microscopy (EM) can elucidate protein spatial relationships to global ultrastructure, but has suffered from tradeoffs of structure preservation, fluorescence retention, resolution, and field of view. We developed a platform for three-dimensional cryogenic SR and focused ion beam-milled block-face EM across entire vitreously frozen cells. The approach preserves ultrastructure while enabling independent SR and EM workflow optimization. We discovered unexpected protein-ultrastructure relationships in mammalian cells including intranuclear vesicles containing endoplasmic reticulum-associated proteins, web-like adhesions between cultured neurons, and chromatin domains subclassified on the basis of transcriptional activity. Our findings illustrate the value of a comprehensive multimodal view of ultrastructural variability across whole cells.

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01/16/20 | Cortical pattern generation during dexterous movement is input-driven.
Sauerbrei BA, Guo J, Cohen JD, Mischiati M, Guo W, Kabra M, Verma N, Mensh B, Branson K, Hantman AW
Nature. 2020 Jan 16;577(7790):386-91. doi: 10.1038/s41586-019-1869-9

The motor cortex controls skilled arm movement by sending temporal patterns of activity to lower motor centres. Local cortical dynamics are thought to shape these patterns throughout movement execution. External inputs have been implicated in setting the initial state of the motor cortex, but they may also have a pattern-generating role. Here we dissect the contribution of local dynamics and inputs to cortical pattern generation during a prehension task in mice. Perturbing cortex to an aberrant state prevented movement initiation, but after the perturbation was released, cortex either bypassed the normal initial state and immediately generated the pattern that controls reaching or failed to generate this pattern. The difference in these two outcomes was probably a result of external inputs. We directly investigated the role of inputs by inactivating the thalamus; this perturbed cortical activity and disrupted limb kinematics at any stage of the movement. Activation of thalamocortical axon terminals at different frequencies disrupted cortical activity and arm movement in a graded manner. Simultaneous recordings revealed that both thalamic activity and the current state of cortex predicted changes in cortical activity. Thus, the pattern generator for dexterous arm movement is distributed across multiple, strongly interacting brain regions.

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01/15/20 | A genetic, genomic, and computational resource for exploring neural circuit function.
Davis FP, Nern A, Picard S, Reiser MB, Rubin GM, Eddy SR, Henry GL
eLife. 2020 Jan 15;9:. doi: 10.7554/eLife.50901

The anatomy of many neural circuits is being characterized with increasing resolution, but their molecular properties remain mostly unknown. Here, we characterize gene expression patterns in distinct neural cell types of the visual system using genetic lines to access individual cell types, the TAPIN-seq method to measure their transcriptomes, and a probabilistic method to interpret these measurements. We used these tools to build a resource of high-resolution transcriptomes for 100 driver lines covering 67 cell types, available at http://www.opticlobe.com. Combining these transcriptomes with recently reported connectomes helps characterize how information is transmitted and processed across a range of scales, from individual synapses to circuit pathways. We describe examples that include identifying neurotransmitters, including cases of apparent co-release, generating functional hypotheses based on receptor expression, as well as identifying strong commonalities between different cell types.

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01/14/20 | Improved HaloTag Ligand Enables BRET Imaging With NanoLuc
Thirukkumaran OM, Wang C, Asouzu NJ, Fron E, Rocha S, Hofkens J, Lavis LD, Mizuno H
Frontiers in Chemistry. 2020 Jan 14;7:. doi: 10.3389/fchem.2019.0093810.3389/fchem.2019.00938.s001
01/13/20 | When does midbrain dopamine activity exert its effects on behavior?
Coddington LT
Nature Neuroscience. 2020 Jan 13;23(2):154-6. doi: 10.1038/s41593-019-0577-y
01/11/20 | Tiled reconstruction improves structured illumination microscopy.
Hoffman DP, Betzig E
bioRxiv. 2020 Jan 11:. doi: 10.1101/2020.01.06.895318

Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is widely used for fast, long-term, live-cell super-resolution imaging. However, SIM images can contain substantial artifacts if the sample does not conform to the underlying assumptions of the reconstruction algorithm. Here we describe a simple, easy to implement, process that can be combined with any reconstruction algorithm to alleviate many common SIM reconstruction artifacts and briefly discuss possible extensions.

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01/10/20 | Fundamental law of memory recall.
Naim M, Katkov M, Romani S, Tsodyks M
Physical Review Letters. 2020 Jan 10;124(1):018101. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.124.018101

Human memory appears to be fragile and unpredictable. Free recall of random lists of words is a standard paradigm used to probe episodic memory. We proposed an associative search process that can be reduced to a deterministic walk on random graphs defined by the structure of memory representations. The corresponding graph model can be solved analytically, resulting in a novel parameter-free prediction for the average number of memory items recalled (R) out of M items in memory: R=sqrt[3πM/2]. This prediction was verified with a specially designed experimental protocol combining large-scale crowd-sourced free recall and recognition experiments with randomly assembled lists of words or common facts. Our results show that human memory can be described by universal laws derived from first principles.

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01/09/20 | Bright and tunable far-red chemigenetic indicators.
Deo C, Abdelfattah AS, Bhargava HK, Berro AJ, Falco N, Moeyaert B, Chupanova M, Lavis LD, Schreiter ER
bioRxiv. 2020 Jan 9: