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2 Publications

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    Bock Lab
    11/09/11 | Large-scale automated histology in the pursuit of connectomes.
    Kleinfeld D, Bharioke A, Blinder P, Bock DD, Briggman KL, Chklovskii DB, Denk W, Helmstaedter M, Kaufhold JP, Lee WA, Meyer HS, Micheva KD, Oberlaender M, Prohaska S, Reid RC, Smith SJ, Takemura S, Tsai PS, Sakmann B
    The Journal of Neuroscience: The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience. 2011 Nov 9;31(45):16125-38. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4077-11.2011

    How does the brain compute? Answering this question necessitates neuronal connectomes, annotated graphs of all synaptic connections within defined brain areas. Further, understanding the energetics of the brain’s computations requires vascular graphs. The assembly of a connectome requires sensitive hardware tools to measure neuronal and neurovascular features in all three dimensions, as well as software and machine learning for data analysis and visualization. We present the state of the art on the reconstruction of circuits and vasculature that link brain anatomy and function. Analysis at the scale of tens of nanometers yields connections between identified neurons, while analysis at the micrometer scale yields probabilistic rules of connection between neurons and exact vascular connectivity.

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    Bock Lab
    03/10/11 | Network anatomy and in vivo physiology of visual cortical neurons.
    Bock DD, Lee WA, Kerlin AM, Andermann ML, Hood G, Wetzel AW, Yurgenson S, Soucy ER, Kim HS, Reid RC
    Nature. 2011 Mar 10;471(7337):177-82. doi: 10.1038/nature09802

    In the cerebral cortex, local circuits consist of tens of thousands of neurons, each of which makes thousands of synaptic connections. Perhaps the biggest impediment to understanding these networks is that we have no wiring diagrams of their interconnections. Even if we had a partial or complete wiring diagram, however, understanding the network would also require information about each neuron’s function. Here we show that the relationship between structure and function can be studied in the cortex with a combination of in vivo physiology and network anatomy. We used two-photon calcium imaging to characterize a functional property–the preferred stimulus orientation–of a group of neurons in the mouse primary visual cortex. Large-scale electron microscopy of serial thin sections was then used to trace a portion of these neurons’ local network. Consistent with a prediction from recent physiological experiments, inhibitory interneurons received convergent anatomical input from nearby excitatory neurons with a broad range of preferred orientations, although weak biases could not be rejected.

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