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191 Publications

Showing 81-90 of 191 results
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    04/05/20 | Orthogonal fluorescent chemogenetic reporters for multicolor imaging
    Tebo AG, Moeyaert B, Thauvin M, Carlon-Andres I, Böken D, Volovitch M, Padilla-Parra S, Dedecker P, Vriz S, Gautier A
    Nature Chemical Biology. 04/2020:1–9. doi: 10.1038/s41589-020-0611-0

    Spectrally separated fluorophores allow the observation of multiple targets simultaneously inside living cells, leading to a deeper understanding of the molecular interplay that regulates cell function and fate. Chemogenetic systems combining a tag and a synthetic fluorophore provide certain advantages over fluorescent proteins since there is no requirement for chromophore maturation. Here, we present the engineering of a set of spectrally orthogonal fluorogen-activating tags based on the fluorescence-activating and absorption shifting tag (FAST) that are compatible with two-color, live-cell imaging. The resulting tags, greenFAST and redFAST, demonstrate orthogonality not only in their fluorogen recognition capabilities, but also in their one- and two-photon absorption profiles. This pair of orthogonal tags allowed the creation of a two-color cell cycle sensor capable of detecting very short, early cell cycles in zebrafish development and the development of split complementation systems capable of detecting multiple protein–protein interactions by live-cell fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescent chemogenetic reporters greenFAST and redFAST were engineered by protein engineering. They display orthogonal fluorogen recognition and spectral properties allowing efficient multicolor imaging of proteins in live cells and organisms.

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    08/01/20 | Precision Calcium Imaging of Dense Neural Populations via a Cell-Body-Targeted Calcium Indicator.
    Shemesh OA, Linghu C, Piatkevich KD, Goodwin D, Celiker OT, Gritton HJ, Romano MF, Gao R, Yu CJ, Tseng H, Bensussen S, Narayan S, Yang C, Freifeld L, Siciliano CA, Gupta I, Wang J, Pak N, Yoon Y, Ullmann JF, Guner-Ataman B, Noamany H, Sheinkopf ZR, Park WM, Asano S, Keating AE, Trimmer JS, Reimer J, Tolias AS, Bear MF, Tye KM, Han X, Ahrens MB, Boyden ES
    Neuron. 2020 Aug 01;107(3):470. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2020.05.029

    Methods for one-photon fluorescent imaging of calcium dynamics can capture the activity of hundreds of neurons across large fields of view at a low equipment complexity and cost. In contrast to two-photon methods, however, one-photon methods suffer from higher levels of crosstalk from neuropil, resulting in a decreased signal-to-noise ratio and artifactual correlations of neural activity. We address this problem by engineering cell-body-targeted variants of the fluorescent calcium indicators GCaMP6f and GCaMP7f. We screened fusions of GCaMP to natural, as well as artificial, peptides and identified fusions that localized GCaMP to within 50 μm of the cell body of neurons in mice and larval zebrafish. One-photon imaging of soma-targeted GCaMP in dense neural circuits reported fewer artifactual spikes from neuropil, an increased signal-to-noise ratio, and decreased artifactual correlation across neurons. Thus, soma-targeting of fluorescent calcium indicators facilitates usage of simple, powerful, one-photon methods for imaging neural calcium dynamics.

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    08/01/20 | Structure of human GABA receptor in an inactive state.
    Park J, Fu Z, Frangaj A, Liu J, Mosyak L, Shen T, Slavkovich VN, Ray KM, Taura J, Cao B, Geng Y, Zuo H, Kou Y, Grassucci R, Chen S, Liu Z, Lin X, Williams JP, Rice WJ, Eng ET, Huang RK, Soni RK, Kloss B, Yu Z, Javitch JA, Hendrickson WA, Slesinger PA, Quick M, Graziano J, Yu H, Fiehn O, Clarke OB, Frank J, Fan QR
    Nature. 2020 Aug 01;584(7820):304-9. doi: 10.1038/s41586-020-2452-0

    The human GABA receptor-a member of the class C family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)-mediates inhibitory neurotransmission and has been implicated in epilepsy, pain and addiction. A unique GPCR that is known to require heterodimerization for function, the GABA receptor has two subunits, GABA and GABA, that are structurally homologous but perform distinct and complementary functions. GABA recognizes orthosteric ligands, while GABA couples with G proteins. Each subunit is characterized by an extracellular Venus flytrap (VFT) module, a descending peptide linker, a seven-helix transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic tail. Although the VFT heterodimer structure has been resolved, the structure of the full-length receptor and its transmembrane signalling mechanism remain unknown. Here we present a near full-length structure of the GABA receptor at atomic resolution, captured in an inactive state by cryo-electron microscopy. Our structure reveals several ligands that preassociate with the receptor, including two large endogenous phospholipids that are embedded within the transmembrane domains to maintain receptor integrity and modulate receptor function. We also identify a previously unknown heterodimer interface between transmembrane helices 3 and 5 of both subunits, which serves as a signature of the inactive conformation. A unique 'intersubunit latch' within this transmembrane interface maintains the inactive state, and its disruption leads to constitutive receptor activity.

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    08/01/20 | Two-parameter mobility assessments discriminate diverse regulatory factor behaviors in chromatin.
    Lerner J, Gomez-Garcia PA, McCarthy RL, Liu Z, Lakadamyali M, Zaret KS
    Molecular Cell. 2020 Aug 1;79(4):677. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2020.05.036

    Enzymatic probes of chromatin structure reveal accessible versus inaccessible chromatin states, while super-resolution microscopy reveals a continuum of chromatin compaction states. Characterizing histone H2B movements by single-molecule tracking (SMT), we resolved chromatin domains ranging from low to high mobility and displaying different subnuclear localizations patterns. Heterochromatin constituents correlated with the lowest mobility chromatin, whereas transcription factors varied widely with regard to their respective mobility with low- or high-mobility chromatin. Pioneer transcription factors, which bind nucleosomes, can access the low-mobility chromatin domains, whereas weak or non-nucleosome binding factors are excluded from the domains and enriched in higher mobility domains. Nonspecific DNA and nucleosome binding accounted for most of the low mobility of strong nucleosome interactor FOXA1. Our analysis shows how the parameters of the mobility of chromatin-bound factors, but not their diffusion behaviors or SMT-residence times within chromatin, distinguish functional characteristics of different chromatin-interacting proteins.

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    08/01/20 | Wiring patterns from auditory sensory neurons to the escape and song-relay pathways in fruit flies.
    Kim H, Horigome M, Ishikawa Y, Li F, Lauritzen JS, Card G, Bock DD, Kamikouchi A
    Journal of Comparative Neurology. 2020 Aug 01;528(12):2068. doi: 10.1002/cne.24877

    Many animals rely on acoustic cues to decide what action to take next. Unraveling the wiring patterns of the auditory neural pathways is prerequisite for understanding such information processing. Here we reconstructed the first step of the auditory neural pathway in the fruit fly brain, from primary to secondary auditory neurons, at the resolution of transmission electron microscopy. By tracing axons of two major subgroups of auditory sensory neurons in fruit flies, low-frequency tuned Johnston's organ (JO)-B neurons and high-frequency tuned JO-A neurons, we observed extensive connections from JO-B neurons to the main second-order neurons in both the song-relay and escape pathways. In contrast, JO-A neurons connected strongly to a neuron in the escape pathway. Our findings suggest that heterogeneous JO neuronal populations could be recruited to modify escape behavior whereas only specific JO neurons contribute to courtship behavior. We also found that all JO neurons have postsynaptic sites at their axons. Presynaptic modulation at the output sites of JO neurons could affect information processing of the auditory neural pathway in flies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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    Zlatic Lab
    09/29/20 | Identification of dopaminergic neurons that can both establish associative memory and acutely terminate its behavioral expression.
    Schleyer M, Weiglein A, Thoener J, Strauch M, Hartenstein V, Kantar Weigelt M, Schuller S, Saumweber T, Eichler K, Rohwedder A, Merhof D, Zlatic M, Thum AS, Gerber B
    Journal of Neuroscience. 2020 Jul 29;40(31):5990-6006. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0290-20.2020

    An adaptive transition from exploring the environment in search of vital resources to exploiting these resources once the search is successful is important to all animals. Here we study the neuronal circuitry that allows larval of either sex to negotiate this exploration-exploitation transition. We do so by combining Pavlovian conditioning with high-resolution behavioral tracking, optogenetic manipulation of individually identified neurons, and EM-data-based analyses of synaptic organization. We find that optogenetic activation of the dopaminergic neuron DAN-i1 can both establish memory during training, and acutely terminate learned search behavior in a subsequent recall test. Its activation leaves innate behavior unaffected, however. Specifically, DAN-i1 activation can establish associative memories of opposite valence upon paired and unpaired training with odor, and its activation during the recall test can terminate the search behavior resulting from either of these memories. Our results further suggest that in its behavioral significance DAN-i1 activation resembles but does not equal sugar reward. Dendrogram analyses of all the synaptic connections between DAN-i1 and its two main targets, the Kenyon cells and the mushroom body output neuron MBON-i1, further suggest that the DAN-i1 signals during training and during the recall test could be delivered to the Kenyon cells and to MBON-i1, respectively, within previously unrecognized, locally confined branching structures. This would provide an elegant circuit motif to terminate search upon its successful completion.In the struggle for survival animals have to explore their environment in search of food. Once food is found, however, it is adaptive to prioritize exploiting it over continuing a search that would now be as pointless as searching for the glasses you are wearing. This exploration-exploitation trade-off is important for animals and humans, as well as for technical search devices. We investigate which of the only 10,000 neurons of a fruit fly larva can tip the balance in this trade-off, and identify a single dopamine neuron called DAN-i1 that can do so. Given the similarities in dopamine neuron function across the animal kingdom, this may reflect a general principle of how search is terminated once it is successful.

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    07/29/20 | Lysosome-targeting chimaeras for degradation of extracellular proteins
    Banik SM, Pedram K, Wisnovsky S, Ahn G, Riley NM, Bertozzi CR
    Nature. Jan-08-2021;584(7820):291 - 297. doi: 10.1038/s41586-020-2545-9

    The majority of therapies that target individual proteins rely on specific activity-modulating interactions with the target protein—for example, enzyme inhibition or ligand blocking. However, several major classes of therapeutically relevant proteins have unknown or inaccessible activity profiles and so cannot be targeted by such strategies. Protein-degradation platforms such as proteolysis-targeting chimaeras (PROTACs)1,2 and others (for example, dTAGs3, Trim-Away4, chaperone-mediated autophagy targeting5 and SNIPERs6) have been developed for proteins that are typically difficult to target; however, these methods involve the manipulation of intracellular protein degradation machinery and are therefore fundamentally limited to proteins that contain cytosolic domains to which ligands can bind and recruit the requisite cellular components. Extracellular and membrane-associated proteins—the products of 40% of all protein-encoding genes7—are key agents in cancer, ageing-related diseases and autoimmune disorders8, and so a general strategy to selectively degrade these proteins has the potential to improve human health. Here we establish the targeted degradation of extracellular and membrane-associated proteins using conjugates that bind both a cell-surface lysosome-shuttling receptor and the extracellular domain of a target protein. These initial lysosome-targeting chimaeras, which we term LYTACs, consist of a small molecule or antibody fused to chemically synthesized glycopeptide ligands that are agonists of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-M6PR). We use LYTACs to develop a CRISPR interference screen that reveals the biochemical pathway for CI-M6PR-mediated cargo internalization in cell lines, and uncover the exocyst complex as a previously unidentified—but essential—component of this pathway. We demonstrate the scope of this platform through the degradation of therapeutically relevant proteins, including apolipoprotein E4, epidermal growth factor receptor, CD71 and programmed death-ligand 1. Our results establish a modular strategy for directing secreted and membrane proteins for lysosomal degradation, with broad implications for biochemical research and for therapeutics.

     
     

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    Sternson Lab
    07/27/20 | Seeing the forest for the trees in obesity.
    Sternson SM
    Nature Metabolism. 2020 Jul 27:. doi: 10.1038/s42255-020-0259-9
    07/27/20 | A general method to optimize and functionalize red-shifted rhodamine dyes.
    Grimm JB, Tkachuk AN, Xie L, Choi H, Mohar B, Falco N, Schaefer K, Patel R, Zheng Q, Liu Z, Lippincott-Schwartz J, Brown TA, Lavis LD
    Nature Methods. 2020 Jul 27:. doi: 10.1038/s41592-020-0909-6

    Expanding the palette of fluorescent dyes is vital to push the frontier of biological imaging. Although rhodamine dyes remain the premier type of small-molecule fluorophore owing to their bioavailability and brightness, variants excited with far-red or near-infrared light suffer from poor performance due to their propensity to adopt a lipophilic, nonfluorescent form. We report a framework for rationalizing rhodamine behavior in biological environments and a general chemical modification for rhodamines that optimizes long-wavelength variants and enables facile functionalization with different chemical groups. This strategy yields red-shifted 'Janelia Fluor' (JF) dyes useful for biological imaging experiments in cells and in vivo.

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    07/01/20 | Towards accurate and unbiased imaging-based differentiation of Parkinson's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal syndrome.
    Correia MM, Rittman T, Barnes CL, Coyle-Gilchrist IT, Ghosh B, Hughes LE, Rowe JB
    Brain Communications. 2020 Jul 1;2(1):fcaa051. doi: 10.1093/braincomms/fcaa051

    The early and accurate differential diagnosis of parkinsonian disorders is still a significant challenge for clinicians. In recent years, a number of studies have used magnetic resonance imaging data combined with machine learning and statistical classifiers to successfully differentiate between different forms of Parkinsonism. However, several questions and methodological issues remain, to minimize bias and artefact-driven classification. In this study, we compared different approaches for feature selection, as well as different magnetic resonance imaging modalities, with well-matched patient groups and tightly controlling for data quality issues related to patient motion. Our sample was drawn from a cohort of 69 healthy controls, and patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (= 35), progressive supranuclear palsy Richardson's syndrome (= 52) and corticobasal syndrome (= 36). Participants underwent standardized T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Strict data quality control and group matching reduced the control and patient numbers to 43, 32, 33 and 26, respectively. We compared two different methods for feature selection and dimensionality reduction: whole-brain principal components analysis, and an anatomical region-of-interest based approach. In both cases, support vector machines were used to construct a statistical model for pairwise classification of healthy controls and patients. The accuracy of each model was estimated using a leave-two-out cross-validation approach, as well as an independent validation using a different set of subjects. Our cross-validation results suggest that using principal components analysis for feature extraction provides higher classification accuracies when compared to a region-of-interest based approach. However, the differences between the two feature extraction methods were significantly reduced when an independent sample was used for validation, suggesting that the principal components analysis approach may be more vulnerable to overfitting with cross-validation. Both T1-weighted and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data could be used to successfully differentiate between subject groups, with neither modality outperforming the other across all pairwise comparisons in the cross-validation analysis. However, features obtained from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data resulted in significantly higher classification accuracies when an independent validation cohort was used. Overall, our results support the use of statistical classification approaches for differential diagnosis of parkinsonian disorders. However, classification accuracy can be affected by group size, age, sex and movement artefacts. With appropriate controls and out-of-sample cross validation, diagnostic biomarker evaluation including magnetic resonance imaging based classifiers may be an important adjunct to clinical evaluation.

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