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175 Janelia Publications

Showing 11-20 of 175 results
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    11/27/22 | ACC neural ensemble dynamics are structured by strategy prevalence
    Mikhail Proskurin , Maxim Manakov , Alla Y. Karpova
    bioRxiv. 2022 Nov 17:. doi: 10.1101/2022.11.17.516909

    Medial frontal cortical areas are thought to play a critical role in the brain's ability to flexibly deploy strategies that are effective in complex settings. Still, the specific circuit computations that underpin this foundational aspect of intelligence remain unclear. Here, by examining neural ensemble activity in rats that sample different strategies in a self-guided search for latent task structure, we demonstrate a robust tracking of individual strategy prevalence in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), especially in an area homologous to primate area 32D. Prevalence encoding in the ACC is wide-scale, independent of reward delivery, and persists through a substantial ensemble reorganization that tags ACC representations with contextual content. Our findings argue that ACC ensemble dynamics is structured by a summary statistic of recent behavioral choices, raising the possibility that ACC plays a role in estimating - through statistical learning - which actions promote the occurrence of events in the environment.

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    11/17/22 | RS-FISH: Precise, interactive, fast, and scalable FISH spot detection
    Ella Bahry , Laura Breimann , Marwan Zouinkhi , Leo Epstein , Klim Kolyvanov , Xi Long , Kyle I S Harrington , Timothée Lionnet , Stephan Preibisch
    Nature Methods. 2022 Nov 17:. doi: 10.1038/s41592-022-01669-y

    Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH)-based methods are powerful tools to study molecular processes with subcellular resolution, relying on accurate identification and localization of diffraction-limited spots in microscopy images. We developed the Radial Symmetry-FISH (RS-FISH) software that accurately, robustly, and quickly detects single-molecule spots in two and three dimensions, making it applicable to several key assays, including single-molecule FISH (smFISH), spatial transcriptomics, and spatial genomics. RS-FISH allows interactive parameter tuning and scales to large sets of images as well as tera-byte sized image volumes such as entire brain scans using straight-forward distributed processing on workstations, clusters, and in the cloud.

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    11/15/22 | Channel-independent function of UNC-9/Innexin in spatial arrangement of GABAergic synapses in .
    Hendi A, Niu L, Snow AW, Ikegami R, Wang Z, Mizumoto K
    eLife. 2022 Nov 15;11:. doi: 10.7554/eLife.80555

    Precise synaptic connection of neurons with their targets is essential for the proper functioning of the nervous system. A plethora of signaling pathways act in concert to mediate the precise spatial arrangement of synaptic connections. Here we show a novel role for a gap junction protein in controlling tiled synaptic arrangement in the GABAergic motor neurons in , in which their axons and synapses overlap minimally with their neighboring neurons within the same class. We found that while EGL-20/Wnt controls axonal tiling, their presynaptic tiling is mediated by a gap junction protein UNC-9/Innexin, that is localized at the presynaptic tiling border between neighboring dorsal D-type GABAergic motor neurons. Strikingly, the gap junction channel activity of UNC-9 is dispensable for its function in controlling tiled presynaptic patterning. While gap junctions are crucial for the proper functioning of the nervous system as channels, our finding uncovered the novel channel-independent role of UNC-9 in synapse patterning.

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    11/13/22 | Brain-wide measurement of protein turnover with high spatial and temporal resolution
    Boaz Mohar , Jonathan B. Grimm , Ronak Patel , Timothy A. Brown , Paul Tillberg , Luke D. Lavis , Nelson Spruston , Karel Svoboda
    bioRxiv. 2022 Nov 13:. doi: 10.1101/2022.11.12.516226

    Cells regulate function by synthesizing and degrading proteins. This turnover ranges from minutes to weeks, as it varies across proteins, cellular compartments, cell types, and tissues. Current methods for tracking protein turnover lack the spatial and temporal resolution needed to investigate these processes, especially in the intact brain, which presents unique challenges. We describe a pulse-chase method (DELTA) for measuring protein turnover with high spatial and temporal resolution throughout the body, including the brain. DELTA relies on rapid covalent capture by HaloTag of fluorophores that were optimized for bioavailability in vivo. The nuclear protein MeCP2 showed brain region- and cell type-specific turnover. The synaptic protein PSD95 was destabilized in specific brain regions by behavioral enrichment. A novel variant of expansion microscopy further facilitated turnover measurements at individual synapses. DELTA enables studies of adaptive and maladaptive plasticity in brain-wide neural circuits.

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    11/10/22 | Robotic Multi-Probe-Single-Actuator Inchworm Neural Microdrive
    Smith R, Kolb I, Tanaka S, Lee A, Harris T, Barbic M
    eLife. 2022 Nov 10:. doi: 10.7554/eLife.71876

    Electrophysiology is one of the major experimental techniques used in neuroscience. The favorable spatial and temporal resolution as well as the increasingly larger site counts of brain recording electrodes contribute to the popularity and importance of electrophysiology in neuroscience. Such electrodes are typically mechanically placed in the brain to perform acute or chronic freely moving animal measurements. The micro positioners currently used for such tasks employ a single translator per independent probe being placed into the targeted brain region, leading to significant size and weight restrictions. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a miniature robotic multi-probe neural microdrive that utilizes novel phase-change-material-filled resistive heater micro-grippers. The microscopic dimensions, gentle gripping action, independent electronic actuation control, and high packing density of the grippers allow for micrometer-precision independent positioning of multiple arbitrarily shaped parallel neural electrodes with only a single piezo actuator in an inchworm motor configuration. This multi-probe-single-actuator design allows for significant size and weight reduction, as well as remote control and potential automation of the microdrive. We demonstrate accurate placement of multiple independent recording electrodes into the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus in vivo in acute and chronic settings. Thus, our robotic neural microdrive technology is applicable towards basic neuroscience and clinical studies, as well as other multi-probe or multi-sensor micro-positioning applications.

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    11/07/22 | Cellpose 2.0: how to train your own model.
    Pachitariu M, Stringer C
    Nature Methods. 2022 Nov 07:. doi: 10.1038/s41592-022-01663-4

    Pretrained neural network models for biological segmentation can provide good out-of-the-box results for many image types. However, such models do not allow users to adapt the segmentation style to their specific needs and can perform suboptimally for test images that are very different from the training images. Here we introduce Cellpose 2.0, a new package that includes an ensemble of diverse pretrained models as well as a human-in-the-loop pipeline for rapid prototyping of new custom models. We show that models pretrained on the Cellpose dataset can be fine-tuned with only 500-1,000 user-annotated regions of interest (ROI) to perform nearly as well as models trained on entire datasets with up to 200,000 ROI. A human-in-the-loop approach further reduced the required user annotation to 100-200 ROI, while maintaining high-quality segmentations. We provide software tools such as an annotation graphical user interface, a model zoo and a human-in-the-loop pipeline to facilitate the adoption of Cellpose 2.0.

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    Looger Lab
    11/07/22 | Chemically stable fluorescent proteins for advanced microscopy.
    Campbell BC, Paez-Segala MG, Looger LL, Petsko GA, Liu CF
    Nature Methods. 2022 Nov 07:. doi: 10.1038/s41592-022-01660-7

    We report the rational engineering of a remarkably stable yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), 'hyperfolder YFP' (hfYFP), that withstands chaotropic conditions that denature most biological structures within seconds, including superfolder green fluorescent protein (GFP). hfYFP contains no cysteines, is chloride insensitive and tolerates aldehyde and osmium tetroxide fixation better than common fluorescent proteins, enabling its use in expansion and electron microscopies. We solved crystal structures of hfYFP (to 1.7-Å resolution), a monomeric variant, monomeric hyperfolder YFP (1.6 Å) and an mGreenLantern mutant (1.2 Å), and then rationally engineered highly stable 405-nm-excitable GFPs, large Stokes shift (LSS) monomeric GFP (LSSmGFP) and LSSA12 from these structures. Lastly, we directly exploited the chemical stability of hfYFP and LSSmGFP by devising a fluorescence-assisted protein purification strategy enabling all steps of denaturing affinity chromatography to be visualized using ultraviolet or blue light. hfYFP and LSSmGFP represent a new generation of robustly stable fluorescent proteins developed for advanced biotechnological applications.

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    11/04/22 | Facemap: a framework for modeling neural activity based on orofacial tracking
    Atika Syeda , Lin Zhong , Renee Tung , Will Long , Marius Pachitariu , Carsen Stringer
    bioRxiv. 2022 Nov 04:. doi: 10.1101/2022.11.03.515121

    Recent studies in mice have shown that orofacial behaviors drive a large fraction of neural activity across the brain. To understand the nature and function of these signals, we need better computational models to characterize the behaviors and relate them to neural activity. Here we developed Facemap, a framework consisting of a keypoint tracking algorithm and a deep neural network encoder for predicting neural activity. We used the Facemap keypoints as input for the deep neural network to predict the activity of ∼50,000 simultaneously-recorded neurons and in visual cortex we doubled the amount of explained variance compared to previous methods. Our keypoint tracking algorithm was more accurate than existing pose estimation tools, while the inference speed was several times faster, making it a powerful tool for closed-loop behavioral experiments. The Facemap tracker was easy to adapt to data from new labs, requiring as few as 10 annotated frames for near-optimal performance. We used Facemap to find that the neuronal activity clusters which were highly driven by behaviors were more spatially spread-out across cortex. We also found that the deep keypoint features inferred by the model had time-asymmetrical state dynamics that were not apparent in the raw keypoint data. In summary, Facemap provides a stepping stone towards understanding the function of the brainwide neural signals and their relation to behavior.

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    11/02/22 | Cap-dependent translation initiation monitored in living cells.
    Gandin V, English BP, Freeman M, Leroux L, Preibisch S, Walpita D, Jaramillo M, Singer RH
    Nature Communications. 2022 Nov 02;13(1):6558. doi: 10.1038/s41467-022-34052-8

    mRNA translation is tightly regulated to preserve cellular homeostasis. Despite extensive biochemical, genetic, and structural studies, a detailed understanding of mRNA translation regulation is lacking. Imaging methodologies able to resolve the binding dynamics of translation factors at single-cell and single-mRNA resolution were necessary to fully elucidate regulation of this paramount process. Here live-cell spectroscopy and single-particle tracking were combined to interrogate the binding dynamics of endogenous initiation factors to the 5'cap. The diffusion of initiation factors (IFs) changed markedly upon their association with mRNA. Quantifying their diffusion characteristics revealed the sequence of IFs assembly and disassembly in cell lines and the clustering of translation in neurons. This approach revealed translation regulation at high spatial and temporal resolution that can be applied to the formation of any endogenous complex that results in a measurable shift in diffusion.

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    Sternson Lab
    11/02/22 | Characterization of Ultrapotent Chemogenetic Ligands for Research Applications in Nonhuman Primates.
    Raper J, Eldridge MA, Sternson SM, Shim JY, Fomani GP, Richmond BJ, Wichmann T, Galvan A
    ACS Chemical Neuroscience. 2022 Nov 02;13(21):3118-3125. doi: 10.1021/acschemneuro.2c00525

    Chemogenetics is a technique for obtaining selective pharmacological control over a cell population by expressing an engineered receptor that is selectively activated by an exogenously administered ligand. A promising approach for neuronal modulation involves the use of "Pharmacologically Selective Actuator Modules" (PSAMs); these chemogenetic receptors are selectively activated by ultrapotent "Pharmacologically Selective Effector Molecules" (uPSEMs). To extend the use of PSAM/PSEMs to studies in nonhuman primates, it is necessary to thoroughly characterize the efficacy and safety of these tools. We describe the time course and brain penetrance in rhesus monkeys of two compounds with promising binding specificity and efficacy profiles in studies, uPSEM792 and uPSEM817, after systemic administration. Rhesus monkeys received subcutaneous (s.c.) or intravenous (i.v.) administration of uPSEM817 (0.064 mg/kg) or uPSEM792 (0.87 mg/kg), and plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected over 48 h. Both compounds exhibited good brain penetrance, relatively slow washout, and negligible conversion to potential metabolites─varenicline or hydroxyvarenicline. In addition, we found that neither of these uPSEMs significantly altered the heart rate or sleep. Our results indicate that both compounds are suitable candidates for neuroscience studies using PSAMs in nonhuman primates.

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