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2 Janelia Publications

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    05/01/13 | Whole-brain functional imaging at cellular resolution using light-sheet microscopy.
    Ahrens MB, Orger MB, Robson DN, Li JM, Keller PJ
    Nature Methods. 2013 May;10(5):413-20. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.2434

    Brain function relies on communication between large populations of neurons across multiple brain areas, a full understanding of which would require knowledge of the time-varying activity of all neurons in the central nervous system. Here we use light-sheet microscopy to record activity, reported through the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP5G, from the entire volume of the brain of the larval zebrafish in vivo at 0.8 Hz, capturing more than 80% of all neurons at single-cell resolution. Demonstrating how this technique can be used to reveal functionally defined circuits across the brain, we identify two populations of neurons with correlated activity patterns. One circuit consists of hindbrain neurons functionally coupled to spinal cord neuropil. The other consists of an anatomically symmetric population in the anterior hindbrain, with activity in the left and right halves oscillating in antiphase, on a timescale of 20 s, and coupled to equally slow oscillations in the inferior olive.

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    02/01/13 | Optogenetics in a transparent animal: circuit function in the larval zebrafish.
    Portugues R, Severi KE, Wyart C, Ahrens MB
    Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 2013 Feb;23(1):119-26. doi: 10.1016/j.conb.2012.11.001

    Optogenetic tools can be used to manipulate neuronal activity in a reversible and specific manner. In recent years, such methods have been applied to uncover causal relationships between activity in specified neuronal circuits and behavior in the larval zebrafish. In this small, transparent, genetic model organism, noninvasive manipulation and monitoring of neuronal activity with light is possible throughout the nervous system. Here we review recent work in which these new tools have been applied to zebrafish, and discuss some of the existing challenges of these approaches.

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