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3 Janelia Publications

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    09/19/13 | Extremes of lineage plasticity in the Drosophila brain.
    Lin S, Marin EC, Yang C, Kao C, Apenteng BA, Huang Y, O’Connor MB, Truman JW, Lee T
    Current Biology. 2013 Sep 19;23(19):1908-13. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.07.074

    An often-overlooked aspect of neural plasticity is the plasticity of neuronal composition, in which the numbers of neurons of particular classes are altered in response to environment and experience. The Drosophila brain features several well-characterized lineages in which a single neuroblast gives rise to multiple neuronal classes in a stereotyped sequence during development [1]. We find that in the intrinsic mushroom body neuron lineage, the numbers for each class are highly plastic, depending on the timing of temporal fate transitions and the rate of neuroblast proliferation. For example, mushroom body neuroblast cycling can continue under starvation conditions, uncoupled from temporal fate transitions that depend on extrinsic cues reflecting organismal growth and development. In contrast, the proliferation rates of antennal lobe lineages are closely associated with organismal development, and their temporal fate changes appear to be cell cycle-dependent, such that the same numbers and types of uniglomerular projection neurons innervate the antennal lobe following various perturbations. We propose that this surprising difference in plasticity for these brain lineages is adaptive, given their respective roles as parallel processors versus discrete carriers of olfactory information.

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    08/15/13 | Diverse neuronal lineages make stereotyped contributions to the Drosophila locomotor control center, the central complex.
    Yang JS, Awasaki T, Yu H, He Y, Ding P, Kao J, Lee T
    The Journal of Comparative Neurology. 2013 Aug 15;521(12):2645-62, Spc1. doi: 10.1002/cne.23339

    The Drosophila central brain develops from a fixed number of neuroblasts. Each neuroblast makes a clone of neurons that exhibit common trajectories. Here we identified 15 distinct clones that carry larval-born neurons innervating the Drosophila central complex (CX), which consists of four midline structures including the protocerebral bridge (PB), fan-shaped body (FB), ellipsoid body (EB), and noduli (NO). Clonal analysis revealed that the small-field CX neurons, which establish intricate projections across different CX substructures, exist in four isomorphic groups that respectively derive from four complex posterior asense-negative lineages. In terms of the region-characteristic large-field CX neurons, we found that two lineages make PB neurons, 10 lineages produce FB neurons, three lineages generate EB neurons, and two lineages yield NO neurons. The diverse FB developmental origins reflect the discrete input pathways for different FB subcompartments. Clonal analysis enlightens both development and anatomy of the insect locomotor control center.

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    04/22/13 | Clonal development and organization of the adult Drosophila central brain.
    Yu H, Awasaki T, Schroeder MD, Long F, Yang JS, He Y, Ding P, Kao J, Wu GY, Peng H, Myers G, Lee T
    Current biology : CB. 2013 Apr 22;23:633-43. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.02.057

    BACKGROUND: The insect brain can be divided into neuropils that are formed by neurites of both local and remote origin. The complexity of the interconnections obscures how these neuropils are established and interconnected through development. The Drosophila central brain develops from a fixed number of neuroblasts (NBs) that deposit neurons in regional clusters. RESULTS: By determining individual NB clones and pursuing their projections into specific neuropils, we unravel the regional development of the brain neural network. Exhaustive clonal analysis revealed 95 stereotyped neuronal lineages with characteristic cell-body locations and neurite trajectories. Most clones show complex projection patterns, but despite the complexity, neighboring clones often coinnervate the same local neuropil or neuropils and further target a restricted set of distant neuropils. CONCLUSIONS: These observations argue for regional clonal development of both neuropils and neuropil connectivity throughout the Drosophila central brain.

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